Tagged: Awards

Here is a recent entry to the 2020 BSS Sundial Design And Restoration Awards which describes a beautiful armillary dial in Sepang, Malaysia that elegantly combines calligraphy with the shape of the dial and the name of the hotel where it is located. Follow the link or click the picture for full details.

BSS Sundial Design And Restoration Awards 2020

There’s still time to enter the competition, so for those who have been creating dials during lockdown now is the time to share! For more information, see details of the competition.

The British Sundial Society is pleased to announce its sixth awards scheme for excellent sundials. The only requirement is that the dials must have been made or restored between January 2016 and December 2020; otherwise this is an open competition.

Entries in the form of one or more photographs and a brief description are invited from amateurs, professionals, members and non-members, from the UK and overseas. Awards (in the form of certificates) will be made for new sundials and for sundial restoration projects, and for entries from juniors, schools and other youth groups.

Please send entries to Doug Bateman in the form of emails and attachments. Entries must be submitted by 31st December 2020.

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Stegenga

This horizontal sundial in the southern hemisphere is by James A. Stegenga.  It is located on the plaza in front of the jury room beside the City Courthouse in Marataízes which is about two degrees north of the Tropic of Capricorn and about 300 miles north-east of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  The dial plate is in the shape of Brazil and the design incorporates 13 green nail heads marking the locations of 13 cities in Brazil.  It was constructed over the period April to November 2015.

2. DIHELION SUNDIAL IN MORNING SUNSHINE AFTER 8AM by ALASTAIR HUNTER

In a break with previous ideas Alastair Hunter has created an original new sundial that has two shadows, one showing the time of day and another the season of the year. This can add more pleasure to having a sundial in a garden. The design was created in 2015 and has been named DIHELION meaning ‘dual sun’ after ancient Greek words. The sundial was shown to the public at ‘Sculpture in the Garden’, the annual sculpture exhibition at The Savill Garden, Egham, Surrey, which ran from 1 September to 31 October.

In sundial terms, DIHELION is the combination in a single piece of a horizontal dial and an altitude dial. The horizontal dial shows the hours. The altitude dial shows the passage of the year’s four seasons by measuring the solstice and equinox declinations. Each dial plate carries a gnomon that casts a shadow onto the other dial. The horizontal plate carries a gnomon for the altitude dial. The vertical plate carries a polar gnomon for the horizontal dial.

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H&W assembled

This reproduction (NOT a ‘replica’ which would include antique patination and the blemishes of age) began life in 2010 at a NASS Conference when an original plate made by Heath & Wing of London was shown to me with a request for a full-size copy re-delineated for its new home on Prince Edward Island in Canada.  Lots of photographic studies were made, many including a mm rule for total accuracy.  Over several weeks the artwork for the dial was created ‘from scratch’ by hand using Adobe illustrator.  In particular, selected lettering from the engraving was traced at high magnification and sent to ‘Your Fonts’ who returned a TrueType font file to allow me to ‘key-in’ the inscriptions in authentic lettering.  Every other artwork aspect is the direct product of my own hand frpm many hours of ‘mousing’.

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8 Installed

PROFESSIONAL RESTORATION CLASS

Submitted by Charles Perry Restorations Ltd,

Praewood Farm, Hemel Hempstead Road, St Albans AL3 6AA

The Project

In 2010, Charles Perry Ltd was contacted to remove, restore and replace the elaborate vertical sundial at All Saints’ Church in Isleworth. The Church dates in part, back to 1398. The first sundial there is believed to have been a painted vertical wooden sundial which was dedicated to the memory of Susannah, fourth wife of Colonel Sir Nicholas Lawes (Chief Justice of Jamaica from 1698 to 1703 and Governor from 1718 to 1722) who had died in 1707 at the age of 47. Church records, such as they are, show that the sundial has been repainted and maintained ever since.

Sadly, the church, except for the tower, was destroyed in 1943 by two boys, who had set fire to five churches in the area in the course of a few days, destroying much of the fabric of All Saints’ and one other. After years of indecision the desire for a full restoration was finally abandoned on cost grounds and in 1970 a smaller modern brick building was openly linked to the remaining tower. It is this building that continues in use today and the then present sundial was mounted high (arguably somewhat too high) on the new Lady Chapel of this building.

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